Task Force on the Co-Location of Different Populations in Adult Care Homes

The Task Force on the Co-Location of Different Populations in Adult Care Homes worked on developing short- and long-term solutions to issues within adult care homes related to the co-location of the frail elderly with individuals with behavioral problems due to mental illness, substance abuse problems, intellectual or other developmental disabilities, or other disabilities.

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Co-Chairs
Jean Farmer-Butterfield
Representative
North Carolina General Assembly
John Snow, JD
Senator
North Carolina General Assembly
Maria Spaulding
Deputy Secretary for Long-Term Care and Family Services
North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
Project Director  Berkeley Yorkery
Project Director
North Carolina Institute of Medicine
The North Carolina General Assembly directed the NCIOM to study “short-term and long-term strategies to address issues within adult care homes that provide residence to persons who are frail and elderly and to persons suffering from mental illness.” (Section 10.78ff(3) of Session Law 2009-451). The Task Force on the Co-Location of Different Populations in Adult Care Homes also examined co-location of other people with behavioral health disorders, such as substance abuse or intellectual or other developmental disabilities, with frail elderly or other people with disabilities. The General Assembly asked the NCIOM to provide an interim report to the 2010 Session of the North Carolina General Assembly and a final report to the 2011 Session.

According to the Division of Health Services Regulation, almost two-thirds of residents of adult care homes, and more than three-fourths of the residents of family care homes had a primary diagnosis of mental illness, intellectual or other developmental disabilities, Alzheimers or other dementia in 2009. Some of these individuals have significant behavioral disorders, which can create safety concerns for themselves, other residents, or the staff. Staff do not always have the training or expertise to appropriately manage people with significant behavioral disorders. Thus, the legislature asked the NCIOM to convene a task force to develop strategies to address this concern.